‘Yes, my dear child, monsters are real. I happen to have one hanging in my basement.’—Rick Yancey, The Monstrumologist.

I don’t deny the fact that I’m a chicken when it comes to horror films, let alone the books—own imagination and interpretations of detailed scenes are far more terrifying than watching it. But as a reader, I try my best to explore different genres and authors and horror/thriller books are included. And I’m not thrilled with it. As much as possible, I read horror books that are for… kids (please don’t judge! heh).

The first time I saw this book is when I read it on Aaron’s book blog, Guy Gone Geek and I’m curious about it because he mentioned that it is scary and gross but I thought that he is just overreacting. I mean, look at the cover! It doesn’t look like a scary book to me and the summary on the back cover seems friendly and simple to me and knowing that it is written for Young Adult readers so I bought it.

It’s about William Henry, a 131-year old man who lived in the 19th century as an orphan and assistant/apprentice of a Monstrumologist named Pellinore Warthrop. What’s Monstrumology? It says that it’s a study of monsters. All of his life with the Monstrumologist, unexpected midnight visitors, unusually big crates and delivered goods are usual happenings at 425 Harrington Lane and one midnight came Erasmus Gray bought something big covered tightly in burlap and Will Henry thought of it as a big fat corpse but to find out that it is a body of a young girl that is entwined with another corpse of an ugly creature called Anthropophagus. These monsters are described as headless monsters with almost three-thousand pieces of razor-sharp teeth located on their stomach with the shape of a football and their black unblinking eyes on their shoulders. They are supposed to be extinct in the world but how in this world these creatures reached New Jerusalem? How many are they? It’s the start of the adventure in the life of William Henry and they will do anything to put an end to the lives of the monsters before they hunt for food again.

While reading the Folio I, Pellinore Warthrop is describing to William Henry what Anthropophagus looks like and how they live and it’s really disturbing to read because they’re… ugly and inhumane. I’m familiar with their appearance because it has similarities with the Ahhh! Real Monsters!’ character, Krum, and it’s safer to think of it rather than the real Anthrophagus. I mean, look for an image of that monster (search it as Anthropophagi, because Anthropophagus will show still images of a film) and let’s see if you can stomach their appearance! No, I refuse to put a picture of it here! I’m scared (please don’t judge hehe).

Anyway, I would like to tell you guys that what Aaron said is the truth. IT’S FUCKING SCARY, VIOLENT AND GROSS THAT I CAN’T HELP IT BUT MIX THEIR FICTIONAL WORLD TO OURS THAT I CANNOT LEAVE MY BED AT NIGHT EVEN IF I NEED TO GO TO THE BATHROOM. I TRIED ONCE BUT I CAN’T SUPPRESS THE THOUGHT THAT THERE MIGHT BE ANTHROPOPHAGUS LURKING IN THE DARKNESS WHILE I PEE IN THE BATHROOM. THEY WILL YANK ME DOWN, TORE ME INTO PIECES AND DUNK ME TO BE SHREDDED BY THEIR RAZOR-SHARP TEETH. OH MY GOD. This thought sends cold sensations down to my spine.

How can I not? These monsters kill and eat HUMAN BEINGS!  And Yancey described it in full detail! Take this as an example, but don’t read it when you know you can’t handle it:

And so he was. The reverend, whose body remained more or less intact, had captured our attention as the locus of the slaughter, but all around it, like shards thrown from a grisly centrifuge, upon the walls and floorboards and even the ceiling above our heads, were fragments and scraps of human flesh, unrecognizable effluvia cemented by blood to nearly every surface: tufts of hair, bits of entrails, splinters of bones, shavings of muscle. In some places the walls were so saturated they literally wept with blood. It was as if the child has been shoved into a grinder and then spewed out in every direction. (page 226)

I may not be a horror book fan but this book is UNFORGETTABLE, gripping and engrossing (gross, too) that I spent almost all my free time to read and finish this. And, it’s awesome that Yancey wrote this book in a poetic way and I am in-love with the prose. I learned a lot of new words that aren’t normally use in other books.

Please congratulate me because I didn’t give up on this book! I’M SO BRAVE AND UNDAUNTED! And I immensely enjoyed the book and I recommend this book to you, guys! I believe that you can handle this kind of book! And I’m so looking forward reading the second book of the series, The Curse of the Wendigo on Halloween!

——

Book # 32

The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey

Bookmarks: 5/5

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This entry was published on 16.06.11 at 2:39 pm. It’s filed under In Which I Write About Books and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

3 thoughts on “‘Yes, my dear child, monsters are real. I happen to have one hanging in my basement.’—Rick Yancey, The Monstrumologist.

  1. CONGRATULATIONS!!! Rick Yancey is too graphic. right?!!

    Let’s do that Curse of Wendigo reading buddy on halloween. We have to push tina to read the first one!

    • Couldn’t agree more! and Yes! Let’s book-push Tina to read it next! I’m excited to read the next book (I can do this!!!)

  2. Pingback: Book Review: The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey « reading is the ultimate aphrodisiac.

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