“There’s a right way of doing things and a wrong way. If you’ve made up your mind to be different from everybody else, I don’t suppose I can stop you, but I really don’t think it’s very considerate” —F. Scott Fitzgerald, A Curious Case of Benjamin Button

It’s a shame to not to know that there’s a book behind some famous motion picture or, let’s say, you never know a certain book unless it is made into a famous motion picture. I don’t deny the fact that I never knew anything about Benjamin Button until he is portrayed by ever-handsome, swoon-worthy guy named Brad Pitt. I watched the whole movie and I dunno, I fell asleep. The film is hell too long!

Anyway, I almost overlooked this very thin book sandwiched between the pile of thick books in a second-hand book store near our home. Thank God I’m wearing glasses that time; no interesting titles and spines will be missed and eureka! I found an almost brand new copy of Francis Scott Fitzgerald’s The Curious Case of Benjamin Button for P45 ($1)! I’ve always wanted to read the book after watching the film but I can’t push myself buy a brand new one because it costs around P300 and it’s too pricey for a 64-paged book.

So, I assume everyone is familiar of this unusual story—Benjamin Button, a person born a septuagenarian, ungrow and die an infant—which is far different from what is shown in the film adaptation. And, I think what’s more enjoyable about the story is how F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote it. The book took me by surprise because I thought it’s going to be a dragging, boring novel (though it’s a thin novel) but it’s actually a light, funny and a heartbreaking read as well. Actually, I’m so emotionally affected on how beleaguered Benjamin Button lived his life—being pushed out by the family and the people around him at the two ends of his life—which is so unfortunate of him. It shows us, the readers, how much people can judge you and dislike you—either be you a young or an old one. But the predicament was forgotten (since he ages backwards) and his life turned into something great during his middle years—success in business, beautiful Hildegard as his wife, military honors, young looks, and the list goes on. But in this glorious years, I find that I didn’t like Benjamin that much,  he’s such a jerk for losing his interest to Hildegard, his wife, and made himself occupied with things and forget about her. It’s just unacceptable and it’s true. Not that I judge young men of today, but it’s true and I can’t bring myself into an explanation how true it is.

In this thin book, there’s a lot of points about reality is shown and I think it’s up to the reader how they are going to reflect on it. I like how great Fitzgerald wrote prose and dialogues and I’m looking forward to read his The Great Gatsby in the future. I think it wouldn’t hurt you to read this book—and it’s better than the film.

Book# 19 for 2011

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Bookmark: 3/5

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This entry was published on 05.03.11 at 2:42 pm. It’s filed under In Which I Write About Books and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

One thought on ““There’s a right way of doing things and a wrong way. If you’ve made up your mind to be different from everybody else, I don’t suppose I can stop you, but I really don’t think it’s very considerate” —F. Scott Fitzgerald, A Curious Case of Benjamin Button

  1. I am glad you picked it up. I agree that the book is better than the movie, but then again it usually is.

    -Laurie

    http://fitzgeraldmusings.blogspot.com/

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